Serving customers from other countries is a truly cultural experience, as not all food enthusiasts adhere to the same set of table rules.

In America if a customer belches and make a big mess at the table, you’ll likely give them a dirty look (and expect a big tip), but in China that’s just a compliment to the chef. Passing food with your left hand in India is disgusting – that’s your bathroom hand! A Mexican patron using a knife and fork is considered arrogant, but in Brazil and Chile it’s a requirement (and in France both must be used at the same time).

I wonder what the etiquette is on food fights?

Read the full article here: How restaurant dining differs in 10 countries
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Allowing your customers to see their food being prepared could be the boost your restaurant needs.

According to a Harvard study, customer satisfaction saw a double-digit increase when the doors between customer and cook were opened. When the cooks are being watched, they’re likely to take extra care in preparing the food. The study also revealed an increase in customer satisfaction if only the cook could see the customer (but not the other way around).

When both customers and cooks could see each other, service was also much faster, and that means more people served. If you’re looking to remodel, consider an open kitchen plan. See the video in the link for more tips on making it work for you.

Read the full article here: Open kitchens boost restaurants’ bottom line
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